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a space for art and other things

likeafieldmouse:

Zhu Jinshi (1990)

1. Black Dan

2. Grey of Berlin

3. Black and White 4

gallowhill:

Anthony Gormley, sculptures from “Domains”, “Bodies in Space" and "Apart" at his studio, 2003

alombreda:

(Jenny Holzer)

moma:

Frida Kahlo, born today in 1907, painted this powerful work shortly after divorcing Diego Rivera, who had been unfaithful. 

[Frida Kahlo. Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair. 1940.]

Wang Tzu-TingBig wind 2, acrylic and pencil on canvas, 2010

Roman Opalka, details from OPALKA 1965/ 1-, 1965-2011

In 1965, in his studio in Warsaw, Opalka began painting a process of counting—from one to infinity. Starting in the top left-hand corner of the canvas and finishing in the bottom right-hand corner, the tiny numbers are painted in horizontal rows. Each new canvas, which the artist calls a ‘detail’, takes up counting where the last left off. Each ‘detail’ is the same size (196 x 135 cm), the dimension of his studio door in Warsaw. All details have the same title, 1965/1-; the idea does not date although the artist has pledged his life to its execution: ‘All my work is a single thing, the description from number one to infinity. A single thing, a single life.’ (via)

Opalka died on August 6, 2011. The final number he painted was 5,607,249.

"Time as we live it and as we create it embodies our progressive disappearance,” Opalka wrote in an essay in 1987. “We are at the same time alive and in the face of death — that is the mystery of all living beings.”

Dissolution #49 (The Kiss)

Photoretouching; solvents on photography, 22x32cm.

artwork by Kuinexs

nypataphysics:

Man Ray, Matisse, Bonnard, Duchamp, Breton, Cocteau, Joyce, Benjamin, Beauvoir - photographs by Gisèle Freund. 

fleurdulys:

The Dream - Odilon Redon

1904

chloefrancillon:

Jean Michel Basquiat (1960-1988)

René Magritte, works from the Période vache (1947-1948)

Regarding both their motifs and their style, the works of Magritte’s Période vache do not constitute a consistent ensemble but rather present themselves as a patchwork of different pseudo-styles borrowing more or less openly from other artists and drawing on the artist’s own earlier works. These elements are transformed into something comic, trivial, or grotesque by being blended with aspects of popular visual culture. With numerous art historical references Magritte ridicules traditional cultural values and aesthetic norms and distances himself from an art scene lusting for innovation. Contrary to his “classical” works, their cool, precise and realistic approach, and the conceptual consideration behind them, the works of Magritte’s Période vache strike us as colorful, two-dimensional, quickly painted, and radiating an astounding directness and spontaneity.

With his manifesto-like protest against all varieties of arrogance and reprimands in the arts, Magritte has become a model for the artist’s triumph over the workings of an art scene that seem to be more overpowering today than they ever were. (via)

"Often when I imagine you,
your wholeness cascades into many shapes.
You run like a herd of luminous deer,
and I am dark;
I am forest."

-

Rainer Maria Rilke,from Rilke’s Book of Hours, I, 45.

(via caveofhypnos)

Works by Shōmei Tōmatsu

The atomic bomb, American occupation and the fragmentation of traditional values defined the post-War generation in Japan. As an active part of avant-garde artistic circles, Tōmatsu avidly chronicled the life and mores of bohemia, where he found salient evidence of this cultural shift. Applying his keenly surreal eye to the human body, Tōmatsu creates a disquieting sense of freedom and abandon. His oeuvre, in the words of writer Leo Rubinfien ‘presses us still harder with another, different kind of ambiguity, fundamentally modern, fundamentally photographic, and distant from the exquisite fogs, magical gestures and decorous circumspection of classical Japan.’ (via)

Yoko Ono

Lucian FreudSelf Portrait, 1956, oil on canvas