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a space for art and other things

Mark RothkoBlue and Grey, 1962, oil on canvas

I’m not an abstractionist… I’m not interested in relationships of color or forms… I’m interested only in expressing basic human emotions—tragedy, ecstasy, doom and so on… The people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience I had when I painted them.”—Mark Rothko, 1956

dionyssos:

Pablo Picasso , page of sketches lithograph 1945

"…Tarkovsky gave me one of the best and most unforgettable experiences in my life and in cinema. Late in the day, in 1971, I was watching a film with Kjell Grede (a Swedish filmmaker) in a screening room from SF. Afterwards we took a look at the screening booth where a number of film cases were lying. ‘What’s that?’ I asked the projectionist. ‘Some fucking Russian film.’ And then I saw Tarkovsky’s name and told Grede: ‘Listen, I read something about this picture. We have to watch it and see what it’s all about.’ We then bribed the projectionist so that he would show it to us … And it was Andrei Rublev. And so, at about 2:30 a.m., we both came out of the screening room with gaunt eyes, wobbly, completely moved, enthusiastic, and shaken. I will never forget it. What was remarkable is that there were no Swedish subtitles! We didn’t understand one word of dialogue, but we were nonetheless overwhelmed. Tarkovsky made another film that I like a lot, The Mirror.” — Ingmar Bergman, 2002

darkbluetile:

Henri Matisse’s studio 1948

likeafieldmouse:

Hense - 700 Delaware (2012) - Mural on abandoned church

neverwasastoryofmorewhoa:

Gustav Klimt’s The Kiss (1907-1908) and Egon Schiele’s Cardinal and Nun (1912)

In 1907, Egon Schiele sought out Gustav Klimt, who generously mentored younger artists, and he took a particular interest in the gifted young Schiele, buying his drawings, offering to exchange them for some of his own, arranging models for him and introducing him to potential patrons. Klimt invited Schiele to exhibit some of his work at the 1909 Vienna Kunstschau, where he encountered the work of Edvard Munch, Jan Toorop, and Vincent van Gogh among others. Schiele began to explore not only the human form, but also human sexuality. At the time, many found the explicitness of his works disturbing.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg

Guardians

In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.

1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum

2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum

3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery

4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum

5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery

6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum

7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum

8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum

9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery

10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery

johnbaldeferrari:

Louise Bourgeois

Rene Magritte, L’Etat de Vielle

Paintings by Vilhelm Hammershøi (1864-1916)

Bayt Al-Suhaymi, Cairo, Egypt

Henri MatisseBlue Nude IV, 1952, gouache on paper cut out

Robert SmithsonSpiral JettyRozel Point, Great Salt Lake, Utah. April 1970, mud, precipitated salt crystals, rocks, water coil 1500’ long and 15’ wide

Sinta Werner and Markus WüsteVersionen, 2009, wood, plaster, paint

blastedheath:

Anton Henning (German, b. 1964), Interieur No. 99, 2001. Oil on canvas, 157 x 199.5 cm. Collection Martijn and Jeannette Sanders.