free parking

a space for art and other things

magictransistor:

Edvard Munch. Woodcuts. Woman’s Head Against the Shore, Melancholy II, Evening Melancholy II, Woman on the Shore II, Encounter in Space, Woman on the Shore I, Two Human Beings The Lonely Ones, Manbathing, The Girls on the Bridge, Towards the Forest II (top to bottom). 1890s-1920.

Cindy ShermanUntitled (#153), 1985

Timm Ulrichs

  1. Ein Stuhl und sein Schatten (A Chair and Its Shadow), 1968/80, Wood, lacquer
  2. Der erste sitzende Stuhl (The First Sitting Chair), 1970, Painted wood

radtracks:

ms. jackson // outkast

i’m sorry, ms. jackson
i am for real
never meant to make your daughter cry
i apologize a trillion times

“Here’s a film that I made out of a deep grief. The grief is my business, in a way, but the grief was helpful in squeezing the little film out of me, that I said, ‘These crazy moths are flying into the candlelight, and burning themselves to death! And that’s what’s happening to me! I don’t have enough money to make these films, and it’s destroying… I’m not feeding my children properly because of these damn films,’ you know, and I’m burning up here … I’m feeling the full horror of some kind of immolation, in a way … So I say ‘Well, I’m going to comprehend this; I’ve got to understand it.’ So I go out with a camera and I start following moths around, well, that was hopeless, I’m not agile enough to follow a moth, even with a camera [laughs] and get anything of any real meaning. And suddenly I realize that… over the light bulbs, there’s all these dead moth wings. And I hate—y’know, hate that. Such a sadness. There must surely be something to do with that, and I tenderly pick them out and I start pasting them onto a strip of film to try to… in one way, you’d say it’s a kind of madness, to give them life again? To animate them again? To put them into some kind of life through the motion picture machine [laughs]? But really, it’s, I think, deeper than that … It’s to engage with this, that otherwise is just an unacceptable… unhappiness, or misery. To engage with it in some way that makes of it something.”

Mothlight (Stan Brakhage, 1963)

Film stills courtesy of the Estate of Stan Brakhage and Fred Camper.

Commentary by Stan Brakhage on By Brakhage: An Anthology, Volume 1, taken from 2002 interview with Bruce Kawin.

Claude Monet, La maison à travers les roses, 1925

rifles:

Bird Transformation, Ana Mendieta

University of Iowa, 1972 

Field of Flowers, 1910

Egon Schiele

seashells4teeth:

Yayoi Kusama lying on the base of My Flower Bed 1962 in New York, c.1965

efedra:

The preparation for “Be the Inside of the Vase” performance by Echo Morgan

likeafieldmouse:

Paul Klee - Memory of a Bird (1932)

"There was earth inside them, and they dug."

- Paul Celan

Mark RothkoBlue and Grey, 1962, oil on canvas

I’m not an abstractionist… I’m not interested in relationships of color or forms… I’m interested only in expressing basic human emotions—tragedy, ecstasy, doom and so on… The people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience I had when I painted them.”—Mark Rothko, 1956

dionyssos:

Pablo Picasso , page of sketches lithograph 1945

"…Tarkovsky gave me one of the best and most unforgettable experiences in my life and in cinema. Late in the day, in 1971, I was watching a film with Kjell Grede (a Swedish filmmaker) in a screening room from SF. Afterwards we took a look at the screening booth where a number of film cases were lying. ‘What’s that?’ I asked the projectionist. ‘Some fucking Russian film.’ And then I saw Tarkovsky’s name and told Grede: ‘Listen, I read something about this picture. We have to watch it and see what it’s all about.’ We then bribed the projectionist so that he would show it to us … And it was Andrei Rublev. And so, at about 2:30 a.m., we both came out of the screening room with gaunt eyes, wobbly, completely moved, enthusiastic, and shaken. I will never forget it. What was remarkable is that there were no Swedish subtitles! We didn’t understand one word of dialogue, but we were nonetheless overwhelmed. Tarkovsky made another film that I like a lot, The Mirror.” — Ingmar Bergman, 2002